More Tips for Documented and Undocumented Immigrants

More Tips for Documented and Undocumented Immigrants

Undocumented immigrants in America are in a very precarious situation that is often accompanied with a sense of fear and uncertainty. Many documented immigrants – particularly older ones – sometimes feel the same level apprehension with being in this country. Who to trust? What to do if confronted by ICE or other agent (s) of the country? Thus, I have prepared some general tips that undocumented and documented immigrants should know. (It might even be worth writing some of these rules down and carrying them with you on your person.)

  • File your tax return every year: As long as you worked at all during the prior year, you should be diligent about filing your tax returns. If you do not it could come back and affect any legal action you may be involved in over your status.
  • Notify USCIS of address changes: All immigrants who are in this country for more than 30 days must notify USCIS of any address change. You must notify this agency within 10 days of your moving. Again, if you do not this could result in the government taking a number of actions against you including deportation.
  • Do not violate any immigration visa provisions or laws: If you are documented and are here on a visa, it is very important to not give the government an excuse to cancel it. Learn any and every law that might violate your visa and memorize them. The future of your stay in this country may depend upon it.
  • Remember that you do still rights: If you are the victim of spousal abuse, have suffered from a medical emergency or are the victim of a crime, do not hesitate asking someone for help. As an immigrant you still have basic human rights. I, attorney Erika Roman have pledged my life to protecting these rights. documents
  • Know where to look for help: Immigrants to the U.S. face a unique set of challenges that native born citizens do not. And though you may feel alone at time – especially if you are undocumented – you are not. There are many agencies that have deviated themselves to helping immigrants adjust to life in this country.
  • Keep copies of everything USCIS sends you: First, the government may lose a form or letter it has sent you. Second, if you ever need legal help your attorney will need any and all correspondence the government has sent you regarding your status here.

These tips are just general guidelines. Each immigration case is different. If you need help about a specific matter, contact me. If you are asking yourself, “where can I find and immigration lawyer near me,” look no further.

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